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Conservation agency bolsters water program; statewide coordination

MONTGOMERY, Alabama (July 6, 2016) –  The Alabama Soil & Water Conservation Committee (SWCC) is pleased to announce the addition of two new members to the team: Allison Jenkins of Wetumpka and April Griffin of Mobile to bolster the agency’s water program and statewide coordination of initiatives.

Jenkins will officially join SWCC in January as Director of Water Programs following a 17-year career as Executive Director of the Alabama Clean Water Partnership.

“We are very fortunate that Allison agreed to join our team. Her vast knowledge of Alabama’s watersheds and expertise in navigating the 319 water management process are invaluable to our organization,” said Dr. William Puckett, SWCC Executive Director.

“Water is increasingly our most critical resource and its future is in limbo. Allison will be instrumental in leading our agency’s efforts to ensure water quality and quantity for all in Alabama.” 

Griffin joins SWCC as the State District Administrative Coordinator (DAC). She primarily oversees and coordinates the activities and training of local DACs in each of Alabama’s 67 conservation districts.

“April is uniquely equipped for this job having served as the Mobile County DAC for 20 years. I am 100 percent confident in her ability to lead our 67 DACS. They are the backbone of our organization and it’s important they have proper support on the state level. I am thrilled to see the good work she will do for our organization,” said Puckett.

Griffin began work on June 1, 2016.

For nearly 80 years, SWCC has promoted healthy soil, sustainable forests, drinkable and fishable water, and clean air by connecting those who use and work the land to education, technical know-how, and resources that assist in conservation efforts and enhance their stewardship. 

SWCC’s 67 conservation districts, one in every county, are governed by a guiding principle of conservation from the ground up and a board of five volunteer supervisors who assess and direct local conservation efforts.

Districts work hand-in-hand with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to secure funding and technical assistance for landowners and farmers.

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